impact of snowstorms on MW propagation

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impact of snowstorms on MW propagation

Postby ku4a » Thu Dec 04, 2003 1:59 pm

Some MW DXers believe that snowstorms enhance MW propagation. Is this true? If so, how does it work?
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Postby AmericanDXer » Mon May 02, 2005 8:34 pm

I couldn't honestly tell you but weather does have an impact on radio waves. Since there is snow on the ground it might bounce a lot further than it normally would...kinda like clouds except what makes it bounce is the snow cover...
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Postby ku4a » Fri May 06, 2005 1:21 pm

I have not observed any weather impact on the MW frequencies, so I thought maybe the "snowstorm" theory would prove to be an exception to the rule. Tomas would know the answer if anyone would :)
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Postby kf4hou » Tue May 24, 2005 5:56 pm

hmm i wonder if them people are talking about signal strentgh or noise levels.. maybe both ? well i could say snow storms might make local noise levels lower which would enhance signal strentgh (SNR). not sure on MF but in UHF,SHF moisture in the air can scatter signals
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Postby AmericanDXer » Thu Aug 03, 2006 10:15 pm

Longer nights help a bit also, however, I dont do a lot of MW listening anymore. I'm more into SW DXing.
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Postby n6hb » Mon Sep 25, 2006 4:45 pm

I don't know if there is theory to support the claim of enhanced propagation. However, I do remember my impressions from when I lived in a place where it actually snowed. During the snowstorm, static would be higher than normal (listening on wire beams or multi-wire diversity arrays). For a period of several hours after a storm ended, I would experience better reception due to a much lower noise floor (making signals seem to "pop"). Atmospheric noise was obviously lower during this time, but I believe there may have also been a reduction in man-made electrical noise due to the power lines being covered with snow. Maybe it made them less dry, and thus, less prone to arc?

Interesting topic.
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Postby americandxer97 » Sat Sep 30, 2006 12:40 am

Yeah, the moisture does reduce the chance of them arcing. I read this on a few sites online the other night.
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